天文学者がこれまでで最大の宇宙カラーイメージを発表
Astronomers release the largest color image of the sky ever made

1月 12, 2011

January 12, 2011
Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)

Today, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) is releasing the largest digital color image of the sky ever made, and its free to all.
The image has been put together over the last decade from millions of 2.8-megapixel images, thus creating a color image of more than a trillion pixels. This terapixel image is so big and detailed that one would need 500,000 high-definition TVs to view it at its full resolution. "This image provides opportunities for many new scientific discoveries in the years to come," exclaims Bob Nichol, a professor at the University of Portsmouth and Scientific Spokesperson for the SDSS-III collaboration.



The new image is at the heart of new data being released by the SDSS-III collaboration at 217th American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle. This new SDSS-III data release, along with the previous data releases that it builds upon, gives astronomers the most comprehensive view of the night sky ever made. SDSS data have already been used to discover nearly half a billion astronomical objects, including asteroids, stars, galaxies anddistant quasars. The latest, most precise positions, colors and shapes for all these objects are also being released today.

"This is one of the biggest bounties in the history of science," says Professor Mike Blanton from New York University, who is leading the data archive work in SDSS-III. Blanton and many other scientists have been working for months preparing the release of all this data. This data will be a legacy for the ages, explains Blanton, as previous ambitious sky surveys like the Palomar Sky Survey of the 1950s are still being used today. We expect the SDSS data to have that sort of shelf life." .



The image was started in 1998 using what was then the worlds largest digital camera a 138-megapixel imaging detector on the back of a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, USA. Over the last decade, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has scanned a third of the whole sky. Now, this imaging camera is being retired, and will be part of the permanent collection at the Smithsonian in recognition of its contributions to Astronomy.



"It’s been wonderful to see the science results that have come from this camera," says Connie Rockosi, an astronomer from the University of California Santa Cruz, who started working on the camera in the 1990s as an undergraduate student with Jim Gunn, Professor of Astronomy at Princeton University and SDSS-I/II Project Scientist. Rockosi’s entire career so far has paralleled the history of the SDSS camera. "It’s a bittersweet feeling to see this camera retired, because I’ve been working with it for nearly 20 years," she says.



But what next? This enormous image has formed the basis for new surveys of the Universe using the SDSS telescope. These surveys rely on spectra, an astronomical technique that uses instruments to spread the light from a star or galaxy into its component wavelengths. Spectra can be used to find the distances to distant galaxies, and the properties (such as temperature and chemical composition) of different types of stars and galaxies.


"We have upgraded the existing SDSS instruments, and we are using them to measure distances to over a million galaxies detected in this image," explains David Schlegel, an astronomer from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Principal Investigator of the new SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Schlegel explains that measuring distances to galaxies is more time-consuming than simply taking their
pictures, but in return, it provides a detailed three-dimensional map of the galaxies’ distribution in space.



BOSS started taking data in 2009 and will continue until 2014, explains Schlegel. Once finished, BOSS will be the largest 3-D map of galaxies ever made, extending the original SDSS galaxy survey to a much larger volume of the Universe. The goal of BOSS is to precisely measure how so-called "Dark Energy" has changed over the recent history of the Universe. These measurements will help astronomers understand the nature of this mysterious substance. "Dark energy is the biggest conundrum facing science today," says Schlegel, "and the SDSS continues to lead the way in trying to figure out what the heck it is!"



In addition to BOSS, the SDSS-III collaboration has been studying the properties and motions of hundreds of thousands of stars in the outer parts of our Milky Way Galaxy. The survey, known as the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration or SEGUE started several years ago but has now been completed as part of the first year of SDSS-III.



In conjunction with the image being released today, astronomers from SEGUE are also releasing the largest map of the outer Galaxy ever released. "This map has been used to study the distribution of stars in our Galaxy," says Rockosi, the Principal Investigator of SEGUE. "We have found many streams of stars that originally belonged to other galaxies that were torn apart by the gravity of our Milky Way. We’ve long thought that galaxies evolve by merging with others; the SEGUE observations confirm this basic picture."



SDSS-III is also undertaking two other surveys of our Galaxy through 2014. The first, called MARVELS, will use a new instrument to repeatedly measure spectra for approximately 8500 nearby stars like our own Sun, looking for the tell-tale wobbles caused by large Jupiter-like planets orbiting them.
MARVELS is predicted to discover around a hundred new giant planets, as well as potentially finding a similar number of "brown dwarfs" that are
intermediate between the most massive planets and the smallest stars.



The second survey is the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is using one of the largest infrared spectrographs ever built to undertake the first systematic study of stars in all parts of our Galaxy; even stars on the other side of our Galaxy beyond the central bulge. Such stars are traditionally difficult to study as their visible light is obscured by large amounts of dust in the disk of our Galaxy. However, by working at longer, infrared wavelengths, APOGEE can study them in great detail, thus revealing their properties and motions to explore how the different components of our Galaxy were put together.



"The SDSS-III is an amazingly diverse project built on the legacy of the original SDSS and SDSS-II surveys," summarizes Nichol. "This image is the culmination of decades of work by hundreds of people, and has already produced many incredible discoveries. Astronomy has a rich tradition of making all such data freely available to the public, and we hope everyone will enjoy it as much as we have."




The team from the University of Tokyo has been a part of the SDSS Collaboration from the very beginning. It continues to play a major role in the collaboration, now lead by Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU). It made this data release possible by contributing the CCDs to the camera for an example. The primary interest of the team is the dark energy.

Naoki Yasuda, a professor of IPMU, commented "SDSS is a survey program to create 3-dimensional map of nearby Universe and study the structure and evolution of the Universe. This data release will open all imaging data taken over last decade to the public. We will continue spectroscopic observation to determine distances to invididual galaxies next four years. The data obtained by SDSS are expected to be an important dataset for the study of astronomy."

Masataka Fukugita, a Principal Investigator of IPMU, commented "A Japanese team has been engaged in the design study, the instrumentation and the verification work from the beginning of the SDSS project. It is our great satisfaction that SDSSⅠ and Ⅱhave achieved significant contributions to establishing cosmology as we understood today and to understanding the current state of the universe. I wish the tradition succeeded in SDSS-Ⅲ by young scientists of the IPMU, pursuing their own science objectives."

Masahiro Takada, an associate professor of IPMU, said "The SDSS-III can even improve our understanding of the Universe, especially the nature of dark energy. Furthermore, by combining the SDSS-III data with the Subaru Hyper SuprimeCam survey we can explore the nature of another dark component, dark matter, which is surrounding around every galaxies, via gravitational lensing."

Hitoshi Murayama, the director of IPMU, remarked "IPMU was established to study the fundamental mysteries of the Universe, and we believe a major survey of distant galaxies combining imaging and spectroscopy is the way forward. We joined SDSS-III to get started with this science, and will conduct even deeper surveys on Subaru telescope from 2012. The first step is imaging using HyperSuprimeCam being constructed, and the next step spectroscopy with PrimeFocusSpectrograph being conceived. The experience from the tremendous success of SDSS-III would be the basis of our future surveys."


ILLUSTRATIONS


Caption:
This illustration shows the wealth of information on scales both small and large available in the SDSS-III’s new image. The picture in the top left shows the SDSS-III view of a small part of the sky, centered on the galaxy Messier 33 (M33). The middle top picture is a further zoom-in on M33, showing the spiral arms of this Galaxy, including the blue knots of intense star formation known as "HII regions." The top right-hand picture is a further zoom into M33 showing the object NGC604, which is one of the largest HII regions in that galaxy.



The figure at the bottom is a map of the whole sky derived from the SDSS-III image, divided into the northern and southern hemispheres of our galaxy. Visible in the map are the clusters and walls of galaxies that are the largest structures in the entire universe.



Larger images of the maps in the northern and southern galactic hemispheres are available at:



http://tinyurl.com/27tntqb

http://tinyurl.com/25z4h3e



All image credits:
M. Blanton and the SDSS-III





ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



The SDSS-III collaboration announces today at the 217th American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting the publication of Data Release Eight (DR8), which can be found at www.sdss3.org/dr8.
All data published as part of DR8 is freely available to other astronomers, scientists and the public. Technical journal papers describing DR8 and the SDSS-III project were also released today on the arXiv e-Print archive.



The SDSS-III Collaboration includes many institutions from around the globe.
Funding for SDSS-III has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Energy.
The SDSS-III is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS-III Collaboration including the University of Arizona, the Brazilian Participation Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, University of Cambridge, University of Florida, the French Participation Group, the German Participation Group, the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Michigan State/Notre Dame/JINA Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, New Mexico State University, New York University, the Ohio State University, the Penn State University, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the Spanish Participation Group, University of Tokyo, the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University of Washington, and Yale University.


CONTACTS

For more details

  • Naoki Yasuda,

IPMU Professor

e-mail. yasuda _at_ icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Media Contact

  • Fusae Miyazoe,

IPMU Press Officer

e-mail. press _at_ ipmu.jp

 


2011年1月12日

数物連携宇宙研究機構(Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe:略称 IPMU)

東京大学を含むスローン・デジタル・スカイ・サーベイⅢ(SDSS-Ⅲ)研究グループは本日シアトル市で開催中の第217回米国天文学会会合でこれまでで最大のデジタル宇宙カラーイメージを公開し、すべての人に無料で提供します。
過去10年を費やして膨大な数の2.8メガピクセルイメージから構築されたこの画像は、1兆個以上のピクセルからなるカラ―イメージです。このテラピクセル・イメージはあまりにも巨大かつ詳細にわたるので、全体を最大解像度で見ようとすると50万個のハイビジョンテレビを並べなければなりません。
「このイメージは今後長年にわたって多くの新発見の機会を提供するでしょう」とSDSS-Ⅲスポークスマンで英国ポーツマス大学教授のボブ・ニコル氏は興奮ぎみに説明しています。
この新しいイメージはシアトル市で開催中の第217回米国天文学会会合でSDSS-Ⅲが公開する新データの要となるものです。今回公開される新SDSS-Ⅲデータは、以前公開され、今回のデータ構築の基礎になったデータとともに、これまでで最も包括的な宇宙のイメージを天文学者に提供します。SDSSデータはすでに小惑星や星や銀河あるいは遠方クェーサーなど5億個にのぼる天体物体の発見に使われてきました。これらの天体すべてについて最新の正確な位置や色や形状のカタログも本日公開されます。
「これは科学史上最大の贈り物のひとつです」、と語るのはSDSS-Ⅲデータのアーカイブ作業を主導するニューヨーク大学のマイク・ブラントン教授です。ブラントン氏をはじめ多くの研究者が今回の公開のために数ヶ月にわたって準備をしてきました。1950年代のパロマー・スカイ・サーベイのような昔の野心的なスカイ・サーベイが今でも基礎的データとして用いられるように、今回のデータも長年にわたる遺産になるとブラントン氏は説明します。「SDSSデータも同じように長い間用いられるのです」。

このイメージ作成は1998年、米国ニューメキシコ州のアパッチ・ポイント観測所に建設されたこのプロジェクト専用の2.5メートル望遠鏡に設置した138メガピクセルのイメージ撮影装置である、当時世界最大のデジタルカメラを使って始まりました。過去10年にわたってスローン・デジタル・スカイ・サーベイは全天の3分の1をスキャンしました。現在、このカメラは引退し、天文学への貢献をたたえるためスミスソニアン博物館に永久保存される予定です。

「このカメラで作成されたイメージから得られたこれまでの学術成果はすばらしいと思います」カリフォルニア大学サンタクルズ校の天文学者コニー・ロコシ氏のコメントです。彼女は1990年代まだプリンストン大学の学部学生の頃にSDSS-Ⅰ/Ⅱのプロジェクト科学者でもあったジム・ガン教授のもとでこのカメラを製作、研究を始めました。これまでのロコシ氏のすべてのキャリアはSDSSカメラの歴史とともに歩んできました。「ほぼ20年間このカメラを使って研究をしてきたので、その引退にはほろ苦い感じがします」ともコメントしています。

これまでの膨大なイメージはSDSS望遠鏡を使った新たな宇宙サーベイの土台を築きました。新しいサーベイでは、星や銀河の光を波長ごとに分ける天文学的技術である分光に重点をおきます。分光は遠方の銀河の距離の測定や、異なった種類の星や銀河の温度や化学組成などといった性質を決めるのに使われます。

「我々はすでに持っているSDSS装置を改良して、このイメージの中で観測された100万個を越える銀河の距離の測定に使っています」と説明するのはローレンス・バークレー国立研究所の天文学者で新しいSDSS-Ⅲバリオン音響振動・分光サーベイ(BOSS)プロジェクトの主任研究者であるデービッド・シュレーゲル氏です。彼によると、距離の測定は写真撮影だけの場合に比べて多くの時間を要しますが、見返りとして銀河の宇宙空間での3次元マップが得られます。

シュレーゲル氏の説明によると、BOSSは2009年から2014年まで続きます。終了すると最初のSDSS銀河サーベイよりはるかに広い宇宙を覆う、これまでで最大の銀河3Dマップになるでしょう。BOSSの目標はダークエネルギーと呼ばれるものが最近の宇宙の歴史でどのように変化してきたかを正確に測定することです。このような測定は天文学者にとってこの謎の物質の正体を解明する手助けになると考えられます。「ダークエネルギーは科学が現在直面する最大の難問です。そしてSDSSはその正体解明の先頭に立ち続けるのです」とシュレーゲル氏は言います。

SDSS-Ⅲ研究チームはBOSSの他に我々の住む天の川銀河の外縁部に存在する無数の星の化学的組成と運動を調べています。「銀河系の解明と探索のためのスローン計画の拡張(SEGUE)」と呼ばれるこのサーベイは数年前に始まり、SDSS-Ⅲの初年度の研究として完了しました。

本日公開されるイメージと同時に、SEGUEに関わる天文学者はこれまでで最大の天の川銀河の外縁部のマップも公開します。「このマップは我々の銀河の星の分布の研究に使われてきました」とSEGUEの主任研究者ロコシがコメントしています。「もともと他の銀河に属していたのに、天の川銀河の重力によって引き離された、多くの星の集まりの流れを我々は見つけました。我々は長い間、銀河はお互いに合体しあって進化していくと考えてきましたが、SEGUEの観測はこの根本的描像を立証しています」。

SDSS-Ⅲは我々の銀河についてさらにふたつのサーベイを2014年まで行います。一つ目はMARVELSと呼ばれ、新しい装置を使って我々の太陽のようなおよそ8500個の近隣の星を繰り返し分光観測して、その周りを周回する大きな木星のような惑星が引き起こす軌道のよろめきを探します。新しい巨大惑星およそ100個と、さらに同数程度の「褐色矮星」(最も重い惑星と最も小さな星の中間に属する物体)がMARVELSから発見されると予想されています。

二つ目のサーベイは「APO銀河系進化実験(APOGEE)」で、これまでに作られたうちで最大級の近赤外線分光装置を使って我々の銀河のすべての領域の星に関する初めての系統的な観測で、銀河中心部の膨らみを突き抜けて反対側の星を観測することもできます。これらの星からの可視光は銀河の円盤にある多量のダストによって遮られるため、これまで観測は困難でした。しかし、波長の長い近赤外線を使うことで、APOGEEではこれらの星の詳細にわたる観測が可能になり、これら星の性質と運動を解明し我々の銀河の異なる部分がどのように合体してきたかを解明できます。

「SDSS-Ⅲは最初のSDSSとSDSS-Ⅱのサーベイの遺産をもとにして構築された実に多様なプロジェクトです」とニコル氏は総括しています。「このイメージは数十年にわたる多くの人たちの活動の賜物です。多くの驚嘆に値する発見がなされました。天文学にはすべてのデータを一般に無料で提供するというすばらしい伝統があります。皆さんが我々と同じようにそれを享受することを期待します」

SDSS-Ⅲに携わるIPMUの研究者は以下のようにコメントしています。

 

安田直樹教授「SDSSは近傍宇宙の3次元地図を作成し、そのデータを元に宇宙の構造や進化を調べるサーベイプログラムです。今回のデータリリースで過去10年間の観測によって得られた画像データすべてが公開されます。今後4年かけて個々の銀河の距離を決定するための分光観測が引き続き行われます。SDSSによって得られるデータは今後の天文学の研究に重要なデータになると期待されています。」

福来正孝IPMU主任研究員「日本のチームは1990年代初頭SDSS計画の当初より設備のデザイン・建設に携わってきました。その結果としてSDSS-Ⅰ/Ⅱが現在の宇宙論の確立と宇宙の現在の理解に大きく寄与できたことには満足しています。これを引き継ぐSDSS-ⅢではIPMUの若い人達の創意で有意義なサイエンスが引き出されることを期待しています。」

高田昌広IPMU准教授「SDSS-Ⅲは宇宙、特にダークエネルギーの性質、に関する我々の理解を進展させることができます。さらに、このSDSS-III期データとすばる望遠鏡のHyper SuprimeCamサーベイを組み合せ、重力レンズ効果を用いることで、すべての銀河に付随していると考えられているもう一つの暗黒成分「暗黒物質」の性質を探ることが可能になります。」

また、IPMUの村山斉機構長は次のようにコメントしています。「IPMUは宇宙の根源的な謎を解明するために設立されました。我々は遠方銀河のイメージングと分光を組み合わせる大規模なサーベイが進むべき道だと考え、SDSS-Ⅲに参加しました。2012年からはすばる望遠鏡を使ったさらに遠方宇宙のサーベイを始める予定です。その第一歩として現在建設中のハイパー・スプライム・カムを使ったイメージングを行い、次いでプライム・フォーカス・スペクトログラフによる分光学研究を計画しています。SDSS-Ⅲの大成功は我々の将来のサーベイの土台になると考えます」


図解

この図解は、SDSS-Ⅲの新しいイメージに含まれる大小様々なスケールでの情報の豊富さを示すものです。上段左の写真は、メシエ33(M33)銀河を中心とした空の小さな一部分をSDSS-Ⅲで観測した様子です。上段真ん中の写真はM33をさらに拡大したもので、この銀河の渦巻腕とともに、「HII領域」として知られる星生成の活発な領域が青い点の集まりとして見えています。上段右の写真は、より一層M33を拡大したもので、この銀河の中で最大のHII領域のひとつである、NGC604という天体を示しています。

下段の図は、SDSS-Ⅲのイメージによって描かれた空全体の地図で、銀河系の北半球と南半球を分けて表示しています。この地図には、宇宙の中の最も大きな構造である銀河団や銀河の壁を見ることができます。

銀河系の北半球と南半球の地図のより大きな画像は、以下から入手可能です。

http://tinyurl.com/27tntqb

http://tinyurl.com/25z4h3e



すべての画像の著作権:

M.BlantonとSDSS-Ⅲ研究グループ


関連サイト


研究グループ



SDSS-III研究チームは世界中のたくさんの研究機関を含んでいます。SDSS-IIIの研究費はアルフレッド・スローン財団、研究チームの各機関、米国科学財団、米国エネルギー省から出ています。SDSS-IIIは以下の機関を含むSDSS-III研究チームのための天体物理学研究連合によって運営されています。

The University of Arizona, the Brazilian Participation Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, University of Cambridge, University of Florida, the French Participation Group, the German Participation Group, the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Michigan State/Notre Dame/JINA Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, New Mexico State University, New York University, the Ohio State University, the Penn State University, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the Spanish Participation Group, University of Tokyo, the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University of Washington, and Yale University.


本件に関するお問い合わせ先

研究内容

  • 安田直樹

IPMU教授

e-mail. yasuda _at_ icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

報道対応

  • 宮副英恵

広報担当

Tel. 04-7136-5977

e-mail. press _at_ ipmu.jp